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VIOLA DAVIS’ BIOGRAPHY

Finding Me is Viola Davis’ story, in her own words, and spans her incredible, inspiring life, from her coming-of-age in Rhode Island to her present day. Hers is a story of overcoming, a true hero’s journey. Deeply personal, brutally honest, and riveting, Finding Me is a timeless and spellbinding memoir that will capture hearts and minds around the globe.

The book will be released on April 26, 2022 and is now available for pre-order

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BLACK LIVES MATTER, a global organization in the US, UK, and Canada, whose mission is to eradicate white supremacy and build local power to intervene in violence inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes. By combating and countering acts of violence, creating space for Black imagination and innovation, and centering Black joy, we are winning immediate improvements in our lives.

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This fansite is strictly against any paparazzi or stalkerazzi pictures. We will not support any kind of bashing or privacy intrusion into Regina’s life and/or the one of people around her. We will also not post any gossip or rumors on private life matters.

Check out the new trailer for Viola€™s new film, Suicide Squad.

Hits theaters on August 5th.


Viola was named as one of Elle€™s 2016 Women in TV!

ELLE€™s 6th annual Women in TV issue shines a light on the must-see women on TV right now, and there€™s no doubt that Priyanka Chopra, Viola Davis, Olivia Wilde, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, and Golden Globe Winner Taraji P. Henson are the women to watch in 2016.

Pick-up ELLE€™s February Women in TV issue€”on select newsstands January 13 and nationwide on January 19€”to read the full interviews and see what each of our cover stars revealed about life and love on and off the small screen.

VIOLA DAVIS
€œWe€™ve been fed a whole slew of lies about women.€ By TV standards, €œif you are anywhere above a size 2, you€™re not having sex. You don€™t have sexual thoughts. You may not even have a vagina. And if you€™re of a certain age, you€™re off the table.€

Watch Davis on How to Get Away With Murder Thursdays on ABC.


Last night Viola attended Elle€™s Women in Television Dinner where she was honored alongside other talented women in television. She looked gorgeous in a Carmen Marc Valvo dress, shoes by Stuart Weitzman, and a shiny Rauwolf clutch. I have added images of Viola arriving at the event to our gallery.


Doing some more gallery work €¦ I have added a bunch of images from a film that was released earlier this year called €œLila & Eve€. Viola co-starred with Jennifer Lopez in this thriller.


Viola DavisStars and showrunners share their thoughts on diversity at Elle€™s annual Women in Television event.

Don€™t blame the Oscars.

That€™s what Viola Davis had to say on Wednesday night when asked about the controversy-turned-crisis now facing Hollywood over the issue of race on screens both big and small. The How to Get Away With Murder star and two-time Academy Award nominee made her way down the red carpet as one of the A-list attendees at Elle€™s annual Women in Television dinner event at Sunset Tower in West Hollywood and opened up briefly about this week€™s headline-dominating discussion.

€œIt€™s not the Oscars. The Oscars are a symptom of a much greater issue and that€™s the issue of the Hollywood movie-making system. How many movies are being made that have this in it,€ she asks as she points to the color on her skin. €œMore films need to be made where we can shine. That€™s the bottom line. The opportunity does not match the talent. There needs to be more opportunity, that€™s just it. And you have to invest in it.€

The statement matches Davis€™ acceptance speech from the Emmys last fall when she picked up a best actress in a drama series trophy for her work on the ABC drama from Shonda Rhimes. In the moving moment from the Sept. 20 telecast, Davis, the first black actress to ever win a best actress Emmy for a leading role on a TV drama, said, €œThe only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity.€

Davis, clad in Carmen Marc Valvo, joined Elle€™s editor-in-chief Robbie Myers at the Hearts on Fire and Olay-sponsored event along with fellow February Women in TV cover stars including Olivia Wilde and Priyanka Chopra. Other guests included Kirsten Dunst, Amanda Peet, Rebecca Romijn, Nina Dobrev, Joy Bryant, Tracee Ellis Ross, Kate Walsh, Sarah Hyland, Constance Zimmer, Malin Akerman and others.

Davis had her own list of names ready to go, referencing the small selection of roles played by women of color in movies that received attention by the Academy. She listed Tessa Thompson and Phylicia Rashad in Creed as well as Zoe Kravitz in Mad Max: Fury Road. But Davis, who recently partnered with Vaseline€™s Healing Project, didn€™t want to go into great detail about the issue of diversity in Hollywood because she noted that it€™s €œa four or five hour conversation that can€™t be had on a red carpet because then it will be reduced to a soundbite or a hashtag.€

A few of Elle€™s other notable guests chimed in briefly, too, offering their take on race issues in Hollywood.

Jenna Elfman: €œUltimately in entertainment, it€™s storytelling about life. So if we€™re making sure that we are representing our multicultural life in the stories, you can show how to have peace in the world through great storytelling involving all people. Conflict drives story and you get conflict through diversity because people come in from different moral codes and mores. It€™s important to have really thick and diverse casting too, to enrich the storytelling.€

Busy Phillips: €œDiversity is key and something we should all be striving towards. The public speaks again and again when they see it on screen, they like it, they want it, and they€™ll pay for it. For whatever reason, it takes the powers that be a minute to catch up, but I feel like the message has been very clear from the shows that have been popular in the last several years, shows like Orange is the New Black and Scandal and others. People are clamoring to see themselves reflected on television. And behind the scenes, we need those voices to be able to tell those stories. Having diversity behind the camera only ensures that those stories can come through.€

Juliette Lewis: €œI€™m looking for diversity in storytelling in all kinds of ways. I€™m into the underdog perspective and what is happening on TV is f€”€” radical and mind-blowing. The medium itself is more conducive to diverse exploration with serialized storytelling. it€™s a fascinating art.

Aja Naomi King (The Birth of a Nation): €œThe problem isn€™t with the Oscar voters, they€™ve inherited the ability to be in this selection club. There won€™t be roles or opportunities for a wider array of actors until we€™re able to achieve diversity in the ranks of studio heads and writers. We need to make those areas of the business more inclusive or somehow see those people dare to tell stories that aren€™t familiar to themselves or their perspectives on life.

Karen David (Galavant and upcoming Cold Feet): €œThe good news is that we are seeing more diversity on TV, and it has to start somewhere. If you start at the nucleus and let it spread, it can have a ripple effect and we are starting to see that. I get asked all the time about diversity, but growing up, I never looked at myself in the mirror and said, €˜Oh, I€™m Karen David and I€™m brown.€™ I never saw that and maybe that€™s because I grew up in Canada and England with all walks of life, people from all over the world. The world is cosmopolitan and we should celebrate that.€

Aline Brosh McKenna (co-creator/executive producer of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend): €œWe need to make more television shows that are about and that feature minorities. Our show is a no-brainer because we are set in West Covina and West Covina is minority white. In order to reflect our community, our show is mostly non-white. We have to be a diverse cast. It€™s not so much color blind as it is color aggressive. It€™s not just race, we are looking for different body types and different orientations and types of people because it€™s part of our show to have interesting faces and backgrounds. We need more of that on TV.€

Melissa Rosenberg (creator/executive producer of Jessica Jones): €œIf young girls and minorities could see themselves on screen, then they would know that they could be it. It is our responsibility to bring (diverse representations) to the screen. It€™s an uphill struggle and one that I€™ve been fighting the good fight over for many, many years. That€™s why I€™m super proud of Jessica Jones and proud of our diverse writers room. The fight continues.€

Sarah Gertrude Shapiro (co-creator/executive producer of UnReal): €œEverybody needs to grow some balls. On Season 2 of our show, we€™re having an African American lead and it felt like a grounded and personal decision in terms of storytelling, but it€™s now turned out to be an important part of the conversation. In terms of being a creator and someone who has a show, it€™s really important to use the platform for good. I don€™t want to fall asleep at the wheel. We talked about feminism during the first season and that€™s something I am really passionate about. Now I want to move the discussion towards race.€

Jennie Snyder Urman (creator/executive producer of Jane the Virgin): €œFor the Academy Awards, they need to figure out membership. TV is a much more inclusive place to be working right now because there are a lot of shows and a lot of different creators and topics that are covered. We have to support new voices and new talent as a community and hope that those projects are recognized.€

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Last night Viola presented Shonda Rhimes the Norman Lear achievement award at the Producers Guild Awards. I have added images to the gallery from the event.


Analise Keating may not be a hero, but Viola Davis just might be.

Davis has won an Emmy, an NAACP Image Award, and two Screen Actors Guild awards for her performance as Keating, a charismatic if conniving law professor on ABC€™s €œHow to Get Away with Murder.€ Saturday she spoke openly during her acceptance speech about the challenges of getting people to come to terms with who the character is, instead of who they perceive her to be.

€œPeople are always saying, €˜Wow, Annalise is an antihero,€™ and €˜Don€™t you worry she€™s not likable?€™ and €˜Don€™t you worry she€™s not a mentor?€™€ Davis said, before continuing, €œAnd I always think, why do I have to be a hero? Why do you have to like me? Why do I have to be a mentor? My job as an actor is to create a human being to the best of my ability. Flawed, messy, maybe not always likable, maybe not always cute.€

But as much as that might ring true of her character, it couldn€™t be further from the truth when it comes to Davis herself.

Throughout her time at Sunday night€™s SAG awards, Davis shared insight about diversity with gathered journalists.

€œWe€™ve become a society of trending topics. Diversity is not a trending topic. It€™s just not. All the actors of color I know don€™t place any limitations on themselves. Regardless of what€™s going on with the Academy, regardless of what€™s going on in Hollywood, they will find a way to be excellent. We always have and always will.€

Davis also weighed in on the pending Oscars boycott, saying that whatever people choose to do regarding the Academy Awards is immaterial and what really counts is what they do at the box office.

€œPlop your money down to see €˜Straight Outta Compton€™ and €˜Dope€™ and €˜Selma.€™ Support directors like Ava DuVernay, Lee Daniels, Spike Lee. Their stores are just as valid and important as anyone else€™s. That€™s more important than boycotting.€

Ultimately, Davis points out, stories about people of color are just stories about people.

€œI think that sometimes people feel like stories of people of color are not inclusive. They are. The works of August Wilson is everyone€™s story. When you watch Annalise, she€™s not just a black woman. She€™s a woman going through life.€

The thoughts Davis shares are simple but her words speak volumes. You may not like Annalise Keating, but it€™s pretty hard not to like Viola Davis.

(Source)


Congratulations to Viola on her win for Outstanding Female Actor Drama for her role on How to Get Away with Murder. I have added a bunch of images to the gallery from the event. Viola looked beautiful in a lavender Zac Posen gown accented with Buccellati jewels.

Thank you to Carol, Lindsey, Gabby, Mouza & AliKat for sharing some of these